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Jul 29, 2018

Native Opinion Episode 135
WE ARE INVISIBLE. THEY DON’T CARE ABOUT US.

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EPISODE SUMMARY:

In this episode of Native Opinion:

How many Indigenous women are missing in the United States? We share a story about a Doctoral student who is trying to develop a complete database to aid in the search for those who are missing, and maybe bring some closure to the families.

In Sacramento County California, a developer is accused of attempting to hide the remains of a Native American Burial Site. We take a look at what laws may have been broken, and why companies try to hide the truth….

The Navajo Nation made an offer of a reported 500+ million dollars to purchase Gun Manufacture Remington which has been for sale. Yet, the company turned down the offer. Why? We examine some plausible reasons…

And…

In its stupid quest to reverse any and all Obama administration legislation, (simply because he was America’s first colored president) Trump and his leadership of losers have decided to open up the Alaska Claims Settlement Act. There are several reasons for this, Oil exploration Being one. However, the impact on the natives' people of Alaska who have understood a settlement of some 40 million acres of their land since 2014, now appears to be in jeopardy… We look at the history of the settlement.

Finally…

A woman and her son are now suffering from the loss of the death of Markeis McGlockton. Why? Because he shoves a white guy in Florida to the ground because he was verbally assaulting his (McGlockton’s) girlfriend because she parked in a handicap spot at a convenience store.

But the supposed “Victim” (the white shooter in this case) claims he “feared for his life” under Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” statute of law, which is apparently acceptable to take a human life. We look at the unequal application of this law towards people of color.



ARTICLES DISCUSSED IN THIS EPISODE:

Doctoral Student Compiles Database of Indigenous Women Who’ve Gone Missing

Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women Series Podcast

Did Developer Hide Evidence of Native American Burial Site?

When the Navajo Nation offered to purchase Remington Arms…

Trump Opens up Alaska Land Claims

NY Giants co-owner on anthem protests: Trump ‘has no understanding of why they take a knee’

FIRST EVER: 40 JEWISH GROUPS WORLDWIDE OPPOSE EQUATING ANTISEMITISM WITH CRITICISM OF ISRAEL


MUSIC PRESENTED IN THIS EPISODE:

Artist: Maimouna Youssef
Track: Ink Pata
Presented by NPR Music

Maimouna Youssef Website

Bio Presented by NPR Music:

Mumu Fresh signs that the teacher arrives when the student is ready. During a recent trip to the Tiny Desk, she came bearing life lessons from the depths of her soul. A regal combination of black power and Native American pride, Mumu Fresh — also known by her birth name Maimouna Youssef — is an abundantly gifted singer and emcee who prances between genres and styles. The Baltimore native fuses her rich multi-octave range and ferocious rap delivery with spiritually-inclined lyrics so potent and mindful they precipitated a wellspring of emotion throughout the room. Mumu is not new to NPR Music. During her guest appearance at February’s August Greene Tiny Desk, she stirred emotions with her verse on “Practice,” which spoke cathartically about the realities of being a black woman. Mumu began her own Tiny Desk in her native Lakota tongue with “Ink Pata,” signaling a call to prayer in a sacred ritual. Looped tribal chants of her own harmonies set the mood as delivered a stirring spoken word performance that journeyed through her ancestral lineage to the struggles of the present day.

Kutupitush! (Thank You!) for listening!