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Feb 24, 2019

Native Opinion Episode 162
WE WILL ALWAYS WIN.

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EPISODE SUMMARY: Is Indian Country being too hard on Elizabeth Warren? A article by Crystal Echohawk says yes.

Religion and Lawmaking…South Dakota legislators seem to live in a cave 9 out of 12 months then come out and push conservative religious agendas for the remainder of the year. We discuss an article from Native Sun News.

And…was John Lennon of the Beatles song “Imagine” Inspire by an Alberta Cree Grandmother? Some research seems to support that possibility.

Music featured in this episode is from Brother and sister Rock Duo…Sihasin.

Plus our Listener feedback & Voicemail ________________________________________________________ The Native Opinon theme song “Honor The People” is by Casper Loma Da Wa.

FIND THE SONG AND MORE OF HIS MUSIC HERE:
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ARTICLES DISCUSSED IN THIS EPISODE.

Changing Elizabeth Warren's story to one about Native America.

Please keep religion out of lawmaking.

Was John Lennon's "Imagine" inspired by an Alberta Cree grandmother?.

Nebraska Winnebago Become Solar Power Leader in Midwest.

There is an encampment in Minneapolis populated by Indigenous people and it is growing.

Mass. Town Residents Can Intervene In Tribe’s Casino Suit. ________________________________________________________ National Native Organizations Respond to Reply Briefs in Brackeen v. Bernhardt

FEDERAL APPELLANTS' REPLY BRIEF, No. 18–11479.

REPLY BRIEF OF APPELLANTS CHEROKEE NATION, ONEIDA NATION, QUINAULT INDIAN NATION, AND MORONGO BAND OF MISSION INDIANS.

REPLY BRIEF OF INTERVENOR NAVAJO NATION.

For Immediate Release - National Native Organizations Respond to Reply Briefs in Brackeen v. Bernhardt

National Native Organizations Respond to Reply Briefs in Brackeen v. Bernhardt (Portland, Ore., February 20, 2019)—In reply briefs filed yesterday with the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in the case Brackeen v. Bernhardt, the United States, and defendant tribal nations reaffirm the constitutionality of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). The briefs also underscore why ICWA's protections continue to be vital for Native children and families. For over 40 years, ICWA has acknowledged the inherent right of tribal governments and the critical role they play to protect their member children and maintain the stability of families. Brackeen v. Bernhardt is the lawsuit brought by Texas, Indiana, Louisiana, and individual plaintiffs, who allege ICWA—a federal statute that has been in effect for more than 40 years and has helped thousands of Native children maintain ties to their families and their tribes—is unconstitutional. It is the first time that a state has sued the federal government over ICWA's constitutionality. The lawsuit names various federal agencies and officials as defendants and five tribal nations (Cherokee Nation, Morongo Band of Mission Indians, Navajo Nation, Oneida Nation, and Quinault Indian Nation) also have intervened as defendants. In addition, amicus briefs in support of ICWA were filed on behalf of 325 tribal nations, 21 states, several members of Congress, and dozens of Native organizations, child welfare organizations, and other allies.


EXTRA ARTICLES

Indigenous California Chefs are Reviving and Preserving Native Cuisines.

Covington teenager sues Washington Post for $250M. _______________________________________________________

MUSIC PRESENTED IN THIS EPISODE

ARTIST: Sihasin

TRACK: Take A Stand

Bio:

(See-ha-sin)

A Navajo Dine' word meaning - to think with hope and assurance. The process of making critical affirmative action of thinking, planning, learning, becoming experienced and confident to adapt.

Brother and sister, Jeneda and Clayson Benally of the Rock Group "Blackfire" from the Navajo (Dine') Nation in Northern Arizona have created their own unique brand of music with bass and drums. This duo grew up protesting the environmental degradation and inhumane acts of cultural genocide against their traditional way of life. Their music reflects hope for equality, healthy and respectful communities and social and environmental justice.

Their latest album released recently in May of 2018 which is entitled "Fight Like A Woman" features 10 tracks of hard-hitting rock with lyrics that celebrate indigenous independence.

TV news desk writes: "The duo believes in creating positive change each and every day and “Fight Like A Woman”, working again with legendary producer Ed Stasium (The Ramones, Talking Heads, Mick Jagger, Living Colour, Soul Asylum), is an incredible personal journey. Clayson says, “Out of the blue Ed called us saying ‘It’s time to get back into the studio’. The state of the political climate, depression of the nation, and the need to work on something from the heart was desperately needed. After hearing the tracks Ed was like ’we can’t rush this album. We’re going to let the songs speak to us. It deserves all the time it takes". Clayson continued, ”We are so blessed to have Ed as part of Sihasin.

Sihasin Website.
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Kutupitush! (Thank You!) for listening!